Transforming Work Related Stress
What is stress. There are a number several different aspects to stress, the two most common are physical stress, where the muscles and the organs of the body are over loaded, but the purpose of the article is to look mental stress. If the mental stress is not dealt with it will eventually lead to ill health, which will manifest itself in any number of ways including heart attacks, strokes, skin conditions and general feelings of malaise. Stress is part of daily life. We need stress to function. It is part of life it motivates, provides excitement and the get up and go feeling. As long as you feel are in control the stress is challenging and invigorating, but too much stress can lead to you feeling overwhelmed and the disabling aspects can take hold. Stress is bodies reaction to a perceived threat or attack. The body we live in today has evolved over many millions of years and for the most part of that period our environment has remained much the same. Until around ten thousand years ago us humans were classed as hunter gatherers. We would go out and forage for food and occasionally go out to hunt. There were dangers in the hunt or we may be attacked by a wild animal. During these times of high stress, your body switches to what's known as ‘fight or flight’ mode. As a result, a mix of hormones and chemicals are released into your body so that you prepare for physical action. Blood might also be diverted to muscles, causing you to lose concentration or become less able to digest food. Unfortunately, in the modern world our mind see the constant pressures of modern life as a threat. When the threat passes, your body usually returns to normal, but if you’re continually under pressure this might not be the case. There’s no universally agreed medical definition of stress. At its most simple, stress is your body's physical response to mental or emotional pressure. Our jobs, relationships, family life or money can all add to our levels of stress. In the UK the NHS states  Stress causes physical changes in the body designed to help you take on threats or difficulties. You may notice that your heart pounds, your breathing quickens, your muscles tense, and you start to sweat. Once the threat or difficulty passes, these physical effects usually fade. But if you're constantly stressed, your body stays in a state of high alert and you may develop stress-related symptoms. Stress can affect how you feel emotionally, mentally and physically. You may fee, overwhelmed, irritable and "wound up", anxious or fearful, lacking in self-esteem You may feel experience, constant worrying, difficulty concentrating , difficulty making decisions How you may have, headaches, muscle tension or pain, dizziness, sleep problems, feeling tired all the time, eating too much or too little You may be drinking or smoking more, snapping at people, avoiding things or people you are having problems with. Stress may be related to: work – for example, unemployment, a high workload or retirement . family – for example, divorce, relationship difficulties or being a carer housing – for example, moving house or problems with neighbours personal issues – for example, coping with a serious illness, bereavement or financial problems It's not always possible to change a stressful situation, but by using HeartMath techniques  we can introduce you to some easy to learn techniques that will put you on top. Using our Building Personal Resilience work book  can  build up an armoury of tools that will be there working for you when the stressful situation arises. You can use these tools to prepare you for events, so you are able to meet them head on.
PHONE 0115 944 0272 or email jack@albioncastle.net
Telephone 0115 944 0272 email jack@albioncastle.net
Transforming Work Related Stress
Telephone 0115 944 0272 email jack@albioncastle.net
What is stress. There are a number several different aspects to stress, the two most common are physical stress, where the muscles and the organs of the body are over loaded, but the purpose of the article is to look mental stress. If the mental stress is not dealt with it will eventually lead to ill health, which will manifest itself in any number of ways including heart attacks, strokes, skin conditions and general feelings of malaise. Stress is part of daily life. We need stress to function. It is part of life it motivates, provides excitement and the get up and go feeling. As long as you feel are in control the stress is challenging and invigorating, but too much stress can lead to you feeling overwhelmed and the disabling aspects can take hold. Stress is bodies reaction to a perceived threat or attack. The body we live in today has evolved over many millions of years and for the most part of that period our environment has remained much the same. Until around ten thousand years ago us humans were classed as hunter gatherers. We would go out and forage for food and occasionally go out to hunt. There were dangers in the hunt or we may be attacked by a wild animal. During these times of high stress, your body switches to what's known as ‘fight or flight’ mode. As a result, a mix of hormones and chemicals are released into your body so that you prepare for physical action. Blood might also be diverted to muscles, causing you to lose concentration or become less able to digest food. Unfortunately, in the modern world our mind see the constant pressures of modern life as a threat. When the threat passes, your body usually returns to normal, but if you’re continually under pressure this might not be the case. There’s no universally agreed medical definition of stress. At its most simple, stress is your body's physical response to mental or emotional pressure. Our jobs, relationships, family life or money can all add to our levels of stress. In the UK the NHS states  Stress causes physical changes in the body designed to help you take on threats or difficulties. You may notice that your heart pounds, your breathing quickens, your muscles tense, and you start to sweat. Once the threat or difficulty passes, these physical effects usually fade. But if you're constantly stressed, your body stays in a state of high alert and you may develop stress-related symptoms. Stress can affect how you feel emotionally, mentally and physically. You may fee, overwhelmed, irritable and "wound up", anxious or fearful, lacking in self-esteem You may feel experience, constant worrying, difficulty concentrating , difficulty making decisions How you may have, headaches, muscle tension or pain, dizziness, sleep problems, feeling tired all the time, eating too much or too little You may be drinking or smoking more, snapping at people, avoiding things or people you are having problems with. Stress may be related to: work – for example, unemployment, a high workload or retirement . family – for example, divorce, relationship difficulties or being a carer housing – for example, moving house or problems with neighbours personal issues – for example, coping with a serious illness, bereavement or financial problems It's not always possible to change a stressful situation, but by using HeartMath techniques  we can introduce you to some easy to learn techniques that will put you on top. Using our Building Personal Resilience work book  can  build up an armoury of tools that will be there working for you when the stressful situation arises. You can use these tools to prepare you for events, so you are able to meet them head on.
PHONE 0115 944 0272 or email jack@albioncastle.net
Transforming Work Related Stress
Telephone 0115 944 0272 email jack@albioncastle.net
What is stress. There are a number several different aspects to stress, the two most common are physical stress, where the muscles and the organs of the body are over loaded, but the purpose of the article is to look mental stress. If the mental stress is not dealt with it will eventually lead to ill health, which will manifest itself in any number of ways including heart attacks, strokes, skin conditions and general feelings of malaise. Stress is part of daily life. We need stress to function. It is part of life it motivates, provides excitement and the get up and go feeling. As long as you feel are in control the stress is challenging and invigorating, but too much stress can lead to you feeling overwhelmed and the disabling aspects can take hold. Stress is bodies reaction to a perceived threat or attack. The body we live in today has evolved over many millions of years and for the most part of that period our environment has remained much the same. Until around ten thousand years ago us humans were classed as hunter gatherers. We would go out and forage for food and occasionally go out to hunt. There were dangers in the hunt or we may be attacked by a wild animal. During these times of high stress, your body switches to what's known as ‘fight or flight’ mode. As a result, a mix of hormones and chemicals are released into your body so that you prepare for physical action. Blood might also be diverted to muscles, causing you to lose concentration or become less able to digest food. Unfortunately, in the modern world our mind see the constant pressures of modern life as a threat. When the threat passes, your body usually returns to normal, but if you’re continually under pressure this might not be the case. There’s no universally agreed medical definition of stress. At its most simple, stress is your body's physical response to mental or emotional pressure. Our jobs, relationships, family life or money can all add to our levels of stress. In the UK the NHS states  Stress causes physical changes in the body designed to help you take on threats or difficulties. You may notice that your heart pounds, your breathing quickens, your muscles tense, and you start to sweat. Once the threat or difficulty passes, these physical effects usually fade. But if you're constantly stressed, your body stays in a state of high alert and you may develop stress-related symptoms. Stress can affect how you feel emotionally, mentally and physically. You may fee, overwhelmed, irritable and "wound up", anxious or fearful, lacking in self-esteem You may feel experience, constant worrying, difficulty concentrating , difficulty making decisions How you may have, headaches, muscle tension or pain, dizziness, sleep problems, feeling tired all the time, eating too much or too little You may be drinking or smoking more, snapping at people, avoiding things or people you are having problems with. Stress may be related to: work – for example, unemployment, a high workload or retirement . family – for example, divorce, relationship difficulties or being a carer housing – for example, moving house or problems with neighbours personal issues – for example, coping with a serious illness, bereavement or financial problems It's not always possible to change a stressful situation, but by using HeartMath techniques  we can introduce you to some easy to learn techniques that will put you on top. Using our Building Personal Resilience work book  can  build up an armoury of tools that will be there working for you when the stressful situation arises. You can use these tools to prepare you for events, so you are able to meet them head on.
PHONE 0115 944 0272 or email jack@albioncastle.net